Category: Art Assembled

Art Assembled – New This Week in May

May has brought with it a fresh wave of inspiration as we embrace the new opportunities that Spring offers. Alongside the launch of our exhibition, Discourse: art across generations and continents, we’ve been thrilled to introduce our audience to a diverse array of New This Week features, showcasing the work of talented artists we’ve had the privilege of collaborating with over the years.

Now, as the month comes to a close, we’re excited to recap each artist we’ve highlighted.

Polly Barton
14pb Guardians, Polly Barton, silk warp with pictorial weft ikat in rayon and viscose, woven in 3 panels. walnut frame, 24 x 49.875”, 2023. Photos by Tom Grotta.

To kick off the month, we featured the remarkable artwork of Polly Barton. In the art world, Barton is a nationally recognized artist who has been working in fiber for 40 years. Trained in Japan, she is known for working with traditional methods of binding and dyeing bundles of fiber to weave contemporary imagery.

In her practice, Barton incorporates a wide range of materials in her work including pigment, soy milk, pastel, metallic threads, stitching, papyrus, and metal leaf. She was also one of the many talented artists featured in Discourse, which is now live on Artsy.

Neda Al-Hilali
1na Crystal Planet, Neda Al-hilali
plaited color paper, acrylic, ink drawing, paper, 43″ x 49″ x 2.5″, 1982

Next, we highlighted the work of talented artist Neda Al-Hilali. This Czechoslovakian artist, who works in the US, is known for for vibrant, detailed works of paper created in the 80s and previously, dramatic “Rope Art,” (featured in Life magazine in the 70s). Al-Hilali is one of the artists included in Subversive, Skilled, Sublime: Fiber Art by Women, that opens at the Smithsonian American Art Museum this week.

Her work has been long recognized, and we are honored to be able to exhibit this strong work by Al-Hilali!

Michael Radyk
8mra Lift, Michael Radyk, cotton jacquard, 66” x 52” x 1”, 2014.

We then turned our spotlight to artist Michael Radyk. Radyk is an artist who explores woven textiles and the qualities inherent in their structure, production, design, craft, and history. He uses both the hand loom and Jacquard loom to produce his work. Radyk designs, weaves, cuts, sculpts, and manipulates his textiles into both two and three-dimensional sculptural forms.

In his artistry, Radyk’s work involves the reinvention of manufactured materials and familiar textiles such as corduroy. He creates work that is based in place and material research using mainly recycled and repurposed materials. ​

Ésme Hofman
4eh Dialogue No.4 (a study in black and white willow skeins), Ésme Hofman, peeled and boiled willow skeins, 7.625″ x 5.75″ x 5.75″, 2024

To close out the month, we highlighted the work of artist Ésme Hofman. Hofman is a traditionally trained basketmaker who learned the foundations of my craft at the German basketry school. When creating, Hofman looks beyond the borders of this traditional handcraft. This gives her freedom to explore creative possibilities, and generates other ways of making. 

Her techniques and materials now vary from the traditional to the contemporary using natural stems, leaves, bark, wire, plastics, vellum, paper and occasionally color. Although fascinated by different possibilities, her my main focus is with the very time-consuming willow skeinwork, a nearly-extinct basketry technique that results in an extremely fine surface texture. Almost like textile, it enables her to create fine objects.

We hope you’ve enjoyed discovering these remarkable works as much as we have. Stay tuned for more exciting updates and features in the months ahead!


Art Assembled – New This Week in April

April was all about highlighting new artists and gearing up for our upcoming exhibition Discourse: art across generations and continents (May 4 – 12, 2024). With just three short days until launch day, the exhibition, and all the featured artists, have been at the forefront of our minds! In case you missed any of our artist highlights from April, we’ve put together a recap for you. Read on for the full scoop!

Chiyoko Tanaka
4cht Grinded Fabric #3233, Chiyoko Tanaka, handwoven raw linen, ramie with brick, 17.25″ x 38.5″, 1988. Photo by Tom Grotta

To kick off the month, we featured the remarkable artwork of Chiyoko Tanaka. Tanaka’s art is a fascinating exploration of time, symbolized through the weaving of countless weft threads. Following the weaving process, Tanaka employs a unique technique she calls “grinding,” where the cloth is rubbed with specialized tools like bricks or white stones. This meticulous process adds depth and texture to her pieces.

Tanaka’s innovative approach has earned her numerous accolades, and we are honored to showcase her extraordinary work.

Mary Merkel-Hess
18mm.1 Seed Head, Mary Merkel-Hess, bamboo and paper, 11” x 9” x 9”, 1990. Photo by Tom Grotta

Next up in April, we turned our spotlight to artist Mary Merkel-Hess. Merkel-Hess is renowned for her captivating ‘landscape reports,’ intricate sculptural forms crafted from reed, bamboo, and paper, inspired by the serene natural landscapes of Iowa.

Merkel-Hess’s work has garnered high praise, notably becoming the first contemporary basket form to be acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. We’re thrilled to include her remarkable pieces in our upcoming exhibition, Discourse, launching this weekend.

 Ed Rossbach
78r Peruvian Tapestry, Ed Rossbach, printed weft, 20″ x 21″, 1972. Photo by Tom Grotta

Next, we highlighted the groundbreaking artwork of the late pioneer artist, Ed Rossbach. Renowned for his innovative approach to weaving, Rossbach fearlessly explored traditional techniques and unorthodox materials like plastics and newspaper. His visionary work transcended the boundaries of basketry, elevating it to a sculptural art form. Known for his imaginative flair, Rossbach infused his creations with unexpected imagery, including references to pop culture.

Rossbach’s iconic pieces will be featured in Discourse this weekend, adding to the rich tapestry of talent on display. We’re truly honored to showcase his groundbreaking work.

Yvonne Pacanovsky Bobrowicz
1ypb Cosmic Series, Yvonne Pacanovsky Bobrowicz, Knotted monofilament, gold leaf, 25″ x 20″ x 7″. Photo by Tom Grotta

We then turned our focus to the late, award-winning artist, Yvonne Pacanovsky Bobrowicz. Renowned in the art world for her mesmerizing sculptures crafted from synthetic monofilament, Bobrowicz’s work captivated audiences with its cascading and light-transmitting qualities. Her artistic vision was deeply rooted in the exploration of interconnections and continuum.

When reflecting on her creations, Bobrowicz expressed, “My work combines natural materials with synthetics, bridging opposites and exploring concepts of randomness and order.” Her pieces, adorned with elements like gold leaf and characterized by reflective surfaces, served as alchemically symbolic representations, unifying contrasting elements in various densities, scales, and configurations.

As expected, Bobrowicz’s exceptional artistry will be showcased in our exhibition this weekend, adding another layer of depth and intrigue to the collection.

 Lija Rage
7lr Home-II, Lija Rage, mixed media, wooden sticks, linen and copper, 53″ x 38″, 2020. Photo by Tom Grotta

Last, but certainly not least, we highlighted the work of artist Lija Rage. In her artistic process, Rage employs a unique approach, painting small sticks and wrapping them in copper wire, meticulously layering them through gluing and sewing until the artwork is brought to completion.

Rage’s pieces possess a timeless quality, distinguished by her vibrant color infusions that draw inspiration from the natural landscapes of Latvia, her home country.

Once again, Rage stands among the many talented artists featured in Discourse this weekend, contributing her distinctive vision and craftsmanship to the exhibition.

Thank you for reading and staying up to date on all our “New This Week” features in April. We hope to see you all in person at Discourse to see some of these works in person. Reserve your spot here.


Art Assembled – New This Week in January

At browngrotta arts, we’re kicking off the year with the same enthusiasm that propels us forward year after year. Throughout January, we’ve had the privilege of shining a spotlight on some extraordinary artists and their creations. The talents of Mariette Rousseau-Vermette, Warren Seeling, Nancy Moore Bess, Federica Luzzi, and Ethel Stein have graced our ‘New This Week’ series.

But, that’s just the beginning of the excitement. We’ve also been hard at work prepping for our next upcoming exhibition.. We will be sharing the details soon, so be sure to keep following along so you don’t miss out!

Until then, we invite you to recap on our past month of ‘New This Week’ features below.

 Ethel Stein
54es Rust Abstract, Ethel Stein, mercerized cotton lampas, 36” x 35.25” x 1”, 2005. Photo by Tom Grotta.

To start off our series for the month, we began by highlighting the late, Ethel Stein. With a career spanning decades, Stein left an indelible mark on the world of weaving and textile art. Her intricate and masterful creations were not only celebrated across the country but also earned her a solo exhibition at the prestigious Art Institute of Chicago in 2014.

What makes Stein’s artistic journey truly exceptional is her mastery of the drawloom—a skill that few contemporary weavers possess. This expertise allowed her to craft intricate textiles that were both technically advanced and visually captivating.

Her influence resonated across the globe, as her works found a place in exhibitions not only in the United States, but also in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and beyond.

Federica Luzzi
13fl White Shell, Federica Luzzi, knotting technique, cotton cord, 15″ x 15″x 7.25″, 2018. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Up next in January, we turned our focus to the talented Federica Luzzi. Luzzi’s vertical loom technique allows her to transform fibers from their traditional two-dimensional frame into captivating three-dimensional creations.

What truly sets Luzzi apart is her presentation. She curates her works in dimensional installations, where they appear as fragments of a galaxy, blending the macrocosm and microcosm seamlessly. Her artistry is akin to a magnetic aggregation of fragile bodies, meticulously arranged like constellations or an enigmatic form of writing.

At the core of Luzzi’s exploration lies a deep connection with nature. Her work delves into the intricate beauty of leaves, barks, seeds, and plant pods. Through her art, she unveils the hidden wonders of these organic elements, inviting viewers to ponder the intricate patterns of the natural world.

Nancy Moore Bess
71nmb Jakago I, Nancy Moore Bess, dyed, kiln-dried Japanese bamboo, waxed linen and cotton, 7.5″ x 4″ x 4″, 2007. Photo Tom Grotta.

Up next in our series, we highlighted the work of artist, Nancy Moore Bess. Based in California, Bess is an artist who views tradition as a reference point rather than a boundary. Her journey has revolved around the idea of mystery and containment within the realm of basketry, and she brings a unique twist to her creations using lids and closures inspired by her time living in Japan.

When creating, Bess seamlessly weaves together the practicality of traditional basketry with an enigmatic, and almost secretive allure. Her works beckon viewers to imagine the hidden treasures they might hold.

We are continuously impressed by the work Bess creates, and that’s exactly why we wanted to shine a light on her, so our audiences can see it too!

 Warren Seeling
7was.1 Shadowfield/ Colored Light/ Single by Warren Seeling, silver brazed stainless steel/ mixed colored plexiglass, 36” x 21” x 8”, 2017. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Nearing the end of the month, we brought you all art from the one and only, Warren Seeling. Seelig’s impact on the art world is significant, with his work featured in over 30 major museum exhibitions worldwide. His relentless exploration of possibilities within textile and fiber art continues to inspire and challenge conventional ideas of texture, weight, and form.

Warren Seelig’s journey as an artist has been marked by a relentless pursuit of innovation. Back in the late ’70s, he ventured into creating structural, fan-like works, using mylar frames and introducing a unique double-weave technique that pushed the boundaries of traditional textile art. Over time, Seelig’s focus evolved, leading him to craft suspended spoke-and-axle pieces and wall-mounted shadow fields.

Mariette Rousseau-Vermette
561mv.1 Repos + Paix, Mariette Rousseau-Vermette, brushed wool, aluminum, 48″ x 54″, 1988.
Photo by Tom Grotta.

To close out our series for the month, we brought you art from the late artist, Mariette Rousseau-Vermette. With a career spanning four decades, she left an indelible mark on the world of tapestries and sculptures, captivating collectors and commissions across the globe.

Rousseau-Vermette’s artistic journey took her from the Quebec School of Fine Arts to working alongside Dorothy Liebes in California. She later participated in five International Tapestry Biennials in Lausanne, using these opportunities to connect with artists worldwide. In the 1980s, she made significant contributions as part of the Art and Architecture program, ultimately heading the Fibers Department at the Banff Center for the Fine Arts.

It’s no wonder why her achievements are so widely recognized! She is truly one of the best.

We hope you enjoyed our January series! Stay tuned for more ‘New This Week’ features in the months ahead.


Art Assembled – New This Week in December

Welcome to the December edition of our Art Assembled series, where we unwrap a month filled with vibrant creations from talented artists. December is a unique time of year, marked by its own kind of magic and reflection. And in December, we had the pleasure of showcasing the incredible works of Dominic Di Mare, Lizzie Farey, Karyl Sisson, and Gizella Warburton. Each artist has brought their unique perspective and creative energy to our New This Week series.

As we approach the year’s end, we want to extend our heartfelt gratitude to you, our loyal supporters and art enthusiasts. Your passion for art fuels our mission, and we’re excited to continue sharing the beauty and creativity of contemporary art with you.

Read on to discover what new art we showcased throughout December!

Dominic Di Mare
29ddm Mourning Station #4, Dominic Di Mare, hawthorn, handmade paper, silk, bone, bird’s egg, feathers, gold and wood beads, 13″ x 7″ x 7″, 1981. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Our month began with a spotlight on Dominic Di Mare‘s exceptional body of work. Di Mare, a distinguished American artist and craftsperson, has left an indelible mark on the world of contemporary art through his diverse array of creative expressions. His artistic voyage has been a testament to his pioneering spirit, always pushing the boundaries of what art can be.

Dominic first garnered acclaim for his groundbreaking work in dimensional weaving in the 1960s, a period when he carved a distinctive niche for himself in the art world. His ability to weave together intricate patterns and textures in three-dimensional space was nothing short of revolutionary. In the 1970s, Di Mare embarked on a new artistic journey, venturing into the realm of cast paper art. This phase saw him seamlessly blend elements of paper, sculpture, and mixed media into a mesmerizing

Over the years, Di Mare’s artistic journey continued to evolve, exploring watercolor paintings and abstract mixed-media sculpture. His art often touches on themes of personal spirituality, inviting viewers to embark on their own introspective journeys through his creations.

Lizzie Farey
3lf.1 Willow Ball 2 Lizzie Farey, willow 18” x 18” x 18”, 2000

Up next in December, we turned out spotlight to Lizzie Farey, a remarkable artist residing in from Scotland. Farey’s work is a testament to her deep connection with the natural world, drawing inspiration from the inherent qualities of the materials found in her Scottish surroundings.

Using locally grown woods such as willow, birch, heather, and bog myrtle, Farey’s creations encompass a wide range, from traditional to organic sculptural forms. Her innovative approach often pushes the boundaries of traditional techniques, resulting in pieces that are both rooted in tradition and remarkably contemporary.

Farey’s art invites viewers to reconnect with the profound pleasures of nature, transporting them to a universal place and time. Her creations are a harmonious fusion of the tangible and the ethereal, showcasing the boundless beauty found in the world around us.

Karyl Sisson
100ks Fissueres III, Karyl Sisson, vintage drinking straws, thread and polymer, 16.5” x 16.5” x 1.75”, 2019

We then turned our attention to Karyl Sisson, a visionary artist based in Los Angeles. Sisson’s work is a testament to her extraordinary ability to weave together the fibers of everyday life, seamlessly blending elements of the past and the present into sculptural and textured forms that transcend traditional boundaries.

Drawing inspiration from a diverse array of sources, including the landscape of Los Angeles, microbiology, and fashion manufacturing, Sisson’s art is a captivating exploration of patterns, repetition, and structure. These themes are at the heart of her work, and she approaches them dimensionally, building upon her foundation in basketry and needlework.

One can’t help but be captivated by Sisson’s innovative use of materials, a practice that allows her to confront domesticity and challenge traditional gender roles. Her recent foray into working with paper straws, inspired by the intricate world of cells and organisms, has resulted in creations that appear to grow naturally and organically, inviting viewers to marvel at the wonders of the microscopic world.

Gizella Warburton
32gw Scirpi Xiii, Gizella Warburton, mixed media fiber sculpture, paint , thread, 13.75″ x 13.75″ x 13.75″, 2023

Last, but certainly not least, we turned our focus to Gizella Warburton, an artist whose abstract compositions take shape through the tactile and contemplative process of drawing with paper, cloth, and thread. Warburton’s artistic journey is deeply intertwined with the materiality of her chosen mediums—cloth, paper, thread, wood, and paint. Through these elements, she connects with an innate human desire to create marks, to decipher the meaning of our physical and emotional landscapes, and to explore the transient nature of the warp and weft of our lives.

The slow, tactile intimacy of stitching serves as a mantra in Warburton’s work, inviting viewers to join her in a contemplative journey. Her creations evoke a sense of meditation, as if each mark and stitch were carefully placed to guide us through the intricate labyrinth of emotions and experiences.

Warburton’s artistry has been showcased in exhibitions across the UK, Europe, and Australia, leaving an indelible mark on the global art scene. Her work invites us to pause, reflect, and unravel the layers of meaning woven into the fabric of our existence.

As we bid farewell to December and this year, we look ahead with great anticipation for what the new year will bring. Thank you for being a part of our art-loving community. We wish you a joyful holiday season and a new year filled with inspiration, creativity, and the boundless beauty of contemporary art. Cheers to the exciting adventures that await us in the year ahead!


Art Assembled – New This Week in November

As November comes to a close, we take a moment to reflect on the remarkable artists and their works that have taken center stage in our New This Week series throughout the month. Naomi Kobayashi, Karyl Sisson, Katherine Westphal, and Laura Foster Nicholson have each shared their unique creative journeys, leaving a lasting impression on our vibrant community.

As we turn the page on November, our online doors remain open for exploration. You can continue to discover the captivating work from Vignettes on our website, where the artistry of Dorothy Gill Barnes, Glen Kaufman, and more continues to shine. Additionally, our exhibition Abundance of Objects graces Artsy, showcasing an impressive array of baskets, ceramics, and sculptures from over three dozen accomplished artists.

Now, we invite you to revisit the highlights of our New This Week features throughout the last month. Read on for more!

 Naomi Kobayashi
66nko Cubic Harmony III, Naomi Kobayashi, koyori thread, washi paper, 5″ x 5″ x 5″, 1995. Photos by Tom Grotta.

Our month began with a spotlight on Naomi Kobayashi, an exceptional textile artist and sculptor whose contributions to contemporary art are both profound and enduring.

Kobayashi’s artistic journey is a tale of dedication and innovation. She began her career by crafting highly constructed, sculptural works of thread, showcasing her mastery of textile artistry. However, her creative path led her to explore new avenues, particularly constructions, often using paper as her medium. These creations exude an airy, ephemeral quality that sets them apart, inviting viewers to engage with her art in unique and profound ways.

And yes, before you even ask, her artwork is included in Abundance of Objects as a part of the Vignettes exhibition on Artsy from now until December 13!

Karyl Sisson
104ks Blue Hole, Karyl Sisson, vintage paper straw wrappers, thread, polymer, 4″ x 5″ x 5″, 2023

Up next in November, we focused on the talented Karyl Sisson, a visionary artist located in Los Angeles. Sisson’s artistic path is a testament to her ability to weave together the threads of everyday life, both past and present, to craft sculptural and textured forms that transcend traditional boundaries. Her work is an exploration of patterns, repetition, and structure, woven together through her foundation in basketry and needlework.

One can’t help but be captivated by Sisson’s ability to confront domesticity and challenge traditional gender roles through her innovative use of materials. Her recent work with paper straws, for example, draws inspiration from the intricate world of cells and organisms, resulting in creations that seem to grow naturally and organically.

Sisson is yet another artist featured in An Abundance of Objects as part of our Vignettes series online on Artsy.

Katherine Westphal
38w Geisha, Katherine Westphal, paper, dyed, heat-transfer photo copy, patched101” x 64” x 4”, 1985

Moving further into November, we highlighted the captivating works of Katherine Westphal, a visionary artist with a profound knack for exploring surface, pattern, and decoration. Westphal’s creative journey was a continuous exploration of her medium, whether it was textiles, quilts, clothing, or baskets.

What truly set Westphal apart was her fearless embrace of fractured and surprising images, which became a signature element of her work. Her collages were vibrant, combining bold imagery with bright colors, inviting viewers to immerse themselves in the visual tapestries she composed.

Drawing from her background in painting, Westphal’s process was one of building up and breaking down, allowing her textiles to evolve in an organic and unpredictable manner. Each piece was a fusion of cutting, sewing, embroidery, quilting, tapestry, and fringes, guided by her intuitive and visual senses until she felt the message was complete.

Notably, Westphal was an early pioneer in incorporating color photocopies into her work, showcasing her innovative spirit. Her legacy is celebrated in our ongoing Vignettes exhibition, where her art continues to inspire and tell its unique story.

Laura Foster Nicholson
24lf The Maze, Laura Foster Nicholson wool, rayon with cotton brocade 35.5” x 32.25” x 2.375”, 1982

Wrapping up our artistic journey through November, we cast our spotlight on Laura Foster Nicholson, a renowned textile artist celebrated for her exquisite handwoven tapestries.

Nicholson’s art speaks to the intersection of art and craft, where each thread is carefully chosen, and every image is intentional. Her dedication to her practice is evident in her extensive lecture and teaching experience, sharing her knowledge and passion with others who are drawn to the world of textile art.

Throughout her career, Nicholson’s distinctive style has left an indelible mark on the art world, captivating audiences with her ability to transform threads into captivating narratives. Her works are not just tapestries; they are vibrant stories woven with the threads of creativity and imagination.

As November comes to an end, we want to express our heartfelt gratitude to our dedicated community of art enthusiasts and supporters. Your unwavering encouragement fuels our passion for bringing the world of contemporary art to life. With the holiday season just around the corner, we are excited to continue sharing the beauty and creativity of our featured artists with you.

Don’t forget, our online viewing room for An Abundance of Objects on Artsy remains open for exploration until December 13. Thank you for being a part of the browngrotta arts community, and we can’t wait to see what December has in store!


Art Assembled – New This Week in October

As October comes to a close, we take a moment to reflect on the incredible artists and their works that have graced our New This Week series throughout the month. Our spotlight shone brightly on the creative minds of Tim Johnson, Gyöngy Laky, Glen Kaufman, Stéphanie Jacques, and Dona Look. Their unique talents and innovative approaches to art have left a lasting impression on our community.

But, that’s not all that October brought to browngrotta arts. We proudly launched the much-anticipated Vignettes exhibition, a harmonious fusion of three distinct showcases. Our in-person exhibition opened its doors, allowing art enthusiasts to experience the masterful craftsmanship of wood sculptor Dorothy Gill Barnes, the visionary weaving and surface design of Glen Kaufman, and the captivating diversity of An Abundance of Objects, featuring an array of baskets, ceramics, and sculptures crafted by over three dozen talented artists.

As we bid farewell to October, we invite you to join us in revisiting the highlights from our New This Week features and to explore the rich tapestry of Vignettes, now viewable on our website. At browngrotta arts, art and creativity continue to converge in a breathtaking display of talent and inspiration.

Tim Johnson
22tj Wall Pocket, Tim Johnson, willow skein, earth pigments, split chestnut and tarred
hemp twine, 20” x 10” x 6”, 2023. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Welcome to another edition of our New This Week series, where we embark on a journey through the world of contemporary art, one artist at a time. To kick off the month of October, we delve into the captivating creations of Tim Johnson, a skilled artist and basketmaker hailing from the United Kingdom.

With a rich history spanning nearly three decades, Tim Johnson has dedicated himself to exploring the intricate relationships between materials, place, nature, and culture. His artistic voyage is a fusion of traditional craftsmanship and innovative techniques, influenced by his extensive travels across the globe.

What sets Tim Johnson apart is his ability to breathe new life into humble materials and age-old practices. He blurs the lines between art and craft, inviting us to reconsider how we perceive both. Notably, you can find his work showcased in the current online version of the Vignettes exhibition at browngrotta arts, a testament to his lasting impact on the world of contemporary art.

Gyöngy Laky
48L.1 Beach Sketch, Gyöngy Laky, twigs, wire, plastic, cloth, 57″ x 50″ x 6″, 1987. Photo by Tom Grotta.

As we look back on our features throughout October, it’s clear that Gyöngy Laky is a remarkable artist who has left an indelible mark on the world of sculpture. Her ability to blend tradition and innovation, creating sculptures that transcend boundaries, is nothing short of inspiring.

Laky’s influence extends far and wide, with her works featured in exhibitions spanning continents. Her early recognition for her linear sculptures, rooted in the architectural techniques of textile arts, marked the beginning of a remarkable career. Beyond gallery spaces, she has ventured into the realm of site-specific outdoor installations and contributed to land art projects in various corners of the globe, showcasing her adaptability and creativity.

We’re thrilled to have shared her captivating artwork with you this past month, and we invite you to explore more of her work, including her presence in the Vignettes exhibition, online November 22.

Glen Kaufman
152-155gk Istana/Seri Menanti, Glen Kaufman, yarn-dyed silk stripe, copper, 28.75″ x 47.5″, 1998. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Up next, we were privileged to feature the remarkable works of the late, renowned artist Glen Kaufman. Kaufman’s artistic legacy, spanning over four remarkable decades, left an indelible mark on the world of art.

Kaufman’s artistic odyssey began with a foundation in textural weaving and macramé, setting the stage for a lifelong pursuit of creative discovery. His restless spirit and boundless imagination led him to traverse uncharted territories in the realm of surface design. With a fusion of traditional techniques and contemporary sensibilities, he crafted sculptural forms that challenged the boundaries of artistic expression.

In the later stages of his career, Kaufman’s work underwent a transformation, reflecting a profound connection with Japanese aesthetics and architecture. His pieces, adorned with intricate photo collages and the application of gold and silver leaf, demonstrated a deep appreciation for the beauty of Japan’s artistic heritage.

As we celebrated Kaufman’s contributions this past month, we were reminded that true artistry transcends the constraints of time and place. We’re honored to continue his legacy by featuring his artistry in our ongoing Vignettes exhibition, where his works continue to inspire and captivate.

Stéphanie Jacques
4-5-20sj Paniers-liens II-IV, Stéphanie Jacques, 60″ x 20.5″ x 16″ (22″ x 17.25″ x 17.25″; 43.25″ x 15.5″ x 17.75″; 60″ x 20.5″ x 16″), 2011. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Continuing our artistic journey through October, we cast our spotlight on Stéphanie Jacques, an artist whose work revolves around the art of connection. Jacques’s unique approach centers on weaving together elements that seemingly exist on opposite ends of the spectrum: hard and soft, old and new, valuable and trivial, conscious and unconscious, human and plant.

Her chosen mediums include wood, wicker, and clay, each one a canvas for her imaginative exploration. Basketry, cutting, and intricate assembly serve as both her tools and her muse, propelling her to discover novel solutions to age-old questions.

With each sculpture and installation, she delves deeper into the notion of connection, weaving together the threads of life in her own unique way. And yes, you’ll also find her work thoughtfully showcased in our ongoing Vignettes exhibition, a testament to her exceptional talent and boundless creativity.

Dona Look
12dl Basket #84, Dona Look, white birch bark and waxed silk thread, 8″ x 7″ x 7″, 1984

And last, but certainly not least, we highlighted the work of artist Dona Look. Look is a skilled basket maker from the beautiful landscapes of Wisconsin. Look’s art is deeply connected to the nature that surrounds her. She starts her creative process by gathering bark from the region’s birch trees. With this simple yet extraordinary material, she weaves intricate baskets, capturing the essence of the woodlands in her craft. To hold everything together, she uses silk thread, turning these natural elements into stunning works of art.

We were delighted to feature this talented artist’s work in the ongoing Vignettes exhibition, where her creations shine alongside those of other exceptional artists.

October has been more than just a showcase of talent; it’s been a month of expansion and connection. The launch of our Vignettes exhibition, both in-person and online, has allowed us to bridge physical and digital spaces, bringing art enthusiasts closer to the remarkable works of Dorothy Gill Barnes, Glen Kaufman, and a myriad of other gifted artists. If you want to learn more about the artists and artwork in Vignettes: one venue; three exhibitions, join our Zoom presentation on November 17 at 7 pm EST: Art on the Rocks: an exhibition talkthrough with spirits!

As we bid farewell to this month, we extend our gratitude to our dedicated community of artists, collectors, and art lovers. We look forward to seeing what November brings!


Art Assembled – New This Week in September

As September draws to a close, we’re eager to take a look back at the remarkable artworks that have graced our New This Week series during the month. Our focus has been twofold: shining a spotlight on the exceptional talents of Chiyoko Tanaka, Karyl Sisson, Glen Kaufman, and Gary Trentham, while also diligently crafting the final details of our eagerly anticipated exhibition, Vignettes: one venue, three exhibitions.

The excitement has been steadily building as we prepare to unveil this exceptional amalgamation of artistic excellence. Vignettes will offer a trifecta of exhibitions featuring the masterful craftsmanship of wood sculptor Dorothy Gill Barnes, the visionary weaving and surface design of Glen Kaufman, and An Abundance of Objects, a captivating showcase featuring a diverse array of baskets, ceramics, and sculptures crafted by over three dozen talented artists.

Join us as we revisit the highlights from our New This Week features in September, and stay tuned for the grand reveal of Vignettes at browngrotta arts next week, where art and creativity converge in a breathtaking display.

Chiyoko Tanaka
Grinded Fabric #282, Chiyoko Tanaka, handwoven, ground fabric (raw linen, ramie) with brick in plexiglass frame, 41″ x 15.875″ x 2.5″, 1995-1996. Photo by Tom Grotta.

As we ventured into September, our New This Week series kicked off with an exploration of art from Chiyoko Tanaka. Originating from Japan, Tanaka’s journey through the realm of textiles has been nothing short of extraordinary. Her distinctive approach to weaving transforms the very act of creation into a profound meditation on the passage of time.

At the heart of Tanaka’s work lies the meticulous process of weaving, where each weft thread becomes a testament to the moments that have slipped by. Once the cloth is woven, she embarks on a ritualistic “grinding” process, where she rubs the fabric ceaselessly with tools like brick or white stone. This unique technique results in textures that convey not only her artistic prowess but also the essence of time itself.

In the world of contemporary Japanese textiles, Chiyoko Tanaka’s work stands as a testament to the captivating interplay of tradition and innovation. Her art invites us to delve into the very fabric of time and texture, and we are thrilled to have shared her remarkable creations this September.

Karyl Sisson
103ks Red Ticket Faux Pot, Karyl Sisson, paper tickets, 9″ x 7″ x 7″, 1997. Photo by Tom Grotta.

As September continued to unfold, our spotlight turned towards renowned artist Karyl Sisson. Hailing from Los Angeles, Sisson’s art is an enchanting interplay of tradition and modernity, a fusion of the ordinary and the extraordinary. For over three decades, she has masterfully woven together the fibers of everyday life, breathing new life into discarded materials.

Sisson’s creations are a testament to her ability to find beauty in the overlooked and underappreciated. In her hands, paper straws are transformed into intricate sculptures that echo the patterns of cells and organisms, giving birth to objects that seem to grow organically.

Beyond the surface, Sisson’s work delves into the heart of domesticity and traditional gender roles, inviting us to reconsider the significance of the everyday. Her art isn’t just a celebration of creativity; it’s a profound reflection on our interconnectedness with the materials that surround us.

As we explored Sisson’s captivating creations this September, we were reminded that art can be found in the most unexpected places, awaiting those with the vision to see it. You can see her work in An Abundance of Objects, part of this Fall’s “Art in the Barn” exhibition at browngrotta arts October 7 through the 15th.

Glen Kaufman
013, 027, 094gk Sumi Swish, Stripes and Kasuri by Glen Kaufman. Mixed media/washi, fabric collage
21” x 41” x 2.5” (each), 2010. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Up next, we were privileged to feature the remarkable works of the late, renowned artist Glen Kaufman. Kaufman’s artistic legacy, spanning over four decades, left an indelible mark on the world of surface design. His creations were not just artworks; they were intricate dances between texture, form, and visual storytelling.

Kaufman’s artistic odyssey began with textural weaving and macramé, but his restless creativity led him to explore uncharted territories in the realm of surface design. His innovative approach was a fusion of traditional techniques and contemporary sensibilities, creating sculptural forms that challenged the boundaries of artistic expression. His later works, adorned with photo collages and the application of gold and silver leaf, reflected a profound connection with Japanese aesthetics and architecture, showcasing the global influence on his artistry.

As we celebrated Kaufman’s contributions this September, we were reminded that true artistry knows no boundaries of time or place. We’re honored to continue his legacy by featuring his art in our upcoming exhibition, Glen Kaufman: Elegant Eloquence and of three exhibitions that make up Vignettes!

Gary Trentham
2gt Untitled, Gary Trentham, wood fiber, 9″ x 11″ x 11″. Photo by Tom Grotta.

As we conclude our artistic journey through September, we pay tribute to the late Gary Trentham, a luminary in the realm of woven textiles and fiber sculptures. Trentham’s artistic roots ran deep, nurtured by a childhood fascination with textiles that would later become his creative muse.

Trentham’s distinctive path to artistic prominence is a testament to his passion and dedication. His baskets, with their quiver-like forms, challenged the conventional perception of textiles and sculpture. Trentham’s artistry was a symphony of form and function, where fabric became a malleable medium for his boundless imagination.

We look forward to featuring Trentham’s extraordinary creations in our upcoming exhibition, The Art of Abundance, one of three exhibitions in Vignettes.

As we close the chapter on September, we eagerly turn the pages to October, where our upcoming exhibition, Vignettes, awaits. We hope to see you all there!


Art Assembled – New This Week in August

As August comes to a close, we’re excited to reflect on the remarkable artwork that has graced our New This Week series throughout the month. This month, our focus has been twofold: celebrating the creative brilliance of Helena Hernmarck, Norma Minkowitz, Gerhardt Knodel, and Ferne Jacobs, while also putting the finishing touches on our upcoming exhibition, Vignettes: one venue, three exhibitions.

The anticipation has been building as we prepare to unveil this extraordinary fusion of artistry in a unique format. Vignettes will present a triad of exhibitions featuring the distinguished wood sculptor Dorothy Gill Barnes, the renowned weaver and surface designer Glen Kaufman, and An Abundance of Objects, showcasing an array of baskets, ceramics, and sculptures by over thirty international artists.

Stay tuned as we recap all of the New This Week features we covered throughout August.

5-6hh Ruskin Tickets, Helena Hernmarck, tapestry in wool, linen and cotton, 59″ x 47″, 1994-2019. Photo by Tom Grotta.

As we journeyed through August, our New This Week series began with a feature of artwork from artist Helena Hernmarck. Hailing from Sweden, Hernmarck is a trailblazer in the world of tapestry, revolutionizing the field with her innovative techniques and captivating designs. Her tapestries are not just artworks; they are harmonious unions of art and architecture, seamlessly integrating into modern spaces.

Hernmarck’s mastery lies in her handweaving technique, which allows her to conjure the illusion of movement within her tapestries. With every thread, she orchestrates a dance of colors and shapes that come alive, captivating our senses and challenging our perceptions.

Her tapestries, as displayed here, are dynamic conversations between art and observer – inviting us to explore their depths from various distances, each unveiling a different facet of the narrative.

Norma Minkowitz
102nm Sophia’s Heart, Norma Minkowitz, crochet, stitched some collage 34.5” x 17 x 13.5”, 2002. Photo by Tom Grotta.

As we ventured further into August, our New This Week spotlight was turned to Norma Minkowitz, a sculptor whose creations embody an intricate dance between structure and surface. Minkowitz has devoted years to pushing the boundaries of crocheted sculptures, weaving them into mesmerizing mesh-like forms that transfix the viewer’s gaze.

Minkowitz’s artistic journey delves deep into the thematic interplay of confinement and release. Her mesh sculptures, delicately formed through the art of crocheting, carry within them a profound reflection on the cycles of life, encapsulating the notions of mortality and rebirth. Beyond their visual allure, her works exude a powerful narrative that intertwines the fragility and resilience of existence.

Incorporating elements from the natural world, Minkowitz often intertwines twigs and branches into her sculptures. With each piece, Minkowitz masterfully transcends mere physicality, inviting us to contemplate the profound complexities that underlie the human experience, and Sophia’s Heart is no exception!

Gerhardt Knodel
3gkn Jacquard Suite #10, Gerhardt Knodel, cotton, linen, metallic gimp, 1982 38” x 30” x 1.75”

Up next we featured art from Gerhardt Knodel. Knodel is known across the world for his contributions that have shaped contemporary fiber art for over five decades. His artistic exploration of textures and textiles has led to pioneering applications that seamlessly merge fibers with interior architecture, pushing the boundaries of creative possibility.

Drawing from his early experiences in theater design, Knodel embarked on a unique path that delved into uncharted territories of textile applications. His innovative concepts resonated globally, showcased in exhibitions around the world and commissioned for contemporary architectural spaces across the United States. Notably, his work extends far beyond the realm of creation; for 25 years, he steered the graduate program in Fiber at the Cranbrook Academy of Art and directed the Academy from 1995-2007, ultimately earning the esteemed title of Director Emeritus.

Through his inventive approach, Knodel invites us to reimagine the potential of fiber and texture in shaping the aesthetics of our surroundings. His journey is a testament to the transformative power of artistic vision, and we are honored to be able to work with him.

Ferne Jacobs
7fj Shadow Figure, Ferne Jacobs, coiled and twined linen thread, 61″ x 11″ x 3″, 1980’s

And as we rounded out the month, we introduced you all to Ferne Jacobs, a pioneering figure who has been at the forefront of the fiber art revolution since the 1960s. With innovative ideas and a penchant for pushing boundaries, Jacobs has carved a new path in the world of sculpture, introducing an entirely fresh format to the realm of artistic expression.

Jacobs’ journey of creativity has led her to transcend the conventional, reshaping materials into striking sculptures that challenge traditional norms. Her acute sense of color, combined with her poetic and intuitive approach, infuses her artworks with a distinctive vibrancy that captures the essence of her artistic vision. Her pieces are more than sculptures; they are vibrant dialogues between imagination and reality, form and color.

As we bid farewell to August, we are humbled by the incredible artistic journeys we’ve had the privilege to explore. In the meantime, we are eagerly awaiting the opening of Vignettes: one venue, three exhibitions on Saturday, October 7. We invite you to register for the event and follow along as we continue to drop new artist features throughout September!


Art Assembled – New This Week in July

Welcome to our July Art Assembled blog, where we are thrilled to highlight the incredible art featured in our New This Week series. Throughout the past month, we had the privilege of showcasing the works of Jane Sauer, Mia Olsson, Mary Giles, Ed Rossbach, and Nancy Koenigsberg – four visionary artists who have left an indelible mark on the world of contemporary art.

During July, we were captivated by the diverse and thought-provoking creations of these artists. From Sauer’s intricate fiber art to Olsson’s evocative sculptures, and from Rossbach’s innovative weaving techniques to Koenigsberg’s mesmerizing wire sculptures, each artwork invited us to explore new dimensions of artistic expression.

Read on to delve into the artistic journeys of these remarkable individuals!

Jane Sauer
Cone Sculpture by Jane Sauer, waxed linen and acrylic paint , 21.75″ x 5″ x 5″, 1996.
Photo by Tom Grotta.

To kick things off, we celebrated the exceptional talent of Jane Sauer, an esteemed contemporary artist acclaimed for her remarkable exploration of fiber arts. Hailing from St. Louis, Missouri, Sauer’s artistic journey began with a focus on painting before a serendipitous encounter with the vibrant fiber arts movement in 1972.

In the realm of fiber art, Sauer’s craft shines brilliantly through her closed basket forms, meticulously crafted from knotted and waxed linen. Her art invites viewers into a world of intimate spaces and personal connections, creating an ambiance reminiscent of the sheltering environment of the womb. Each of her beautifully intricate designs thoughtfully explores the concept of “personal space,” leaving us captivated by the delicate interplay between form and function.

Through her artistic expression, Sauer deftly weaves together threads of emotions, experiences, and memories, forming art pieces that speak to the heart and soul. Her ability to create compelling narratives through the interplay of fibers is a testament to her mastery of the craft and her unique artistic vision.

Mia Olsson
10mo Pleated, Golden, Mia Olsson, sisal fibers, 30.625″” x 27.125″ x 2.55″, 2020.
Photo by Tom Grotta.

To continue on with our New This Week series July, we showcased the transformative creations of Mia Olsson, a Swedish fiber artist whose work defies expectations and pushes the boundaries of textile fibers. With an alchemical touch, Olsson works her magic on prickly sisal fibers, transforming them into ethereal and semi-transparent wall sculptures that enthrall the senses.

In her artistic practice, Olsson delves deep into the inherent properties and characteristics of textile fibers, exploring their untapped potential with ingenuity and creativity. Her works, dyed in richly saturated warm tones, evoke a sense of intrigue and wonder, inviting us to contemplate the magic of materials and the boundless possibilities they hold.

Olsson’s artistry bridges the gap between the ethereal and the earthly, seamlessly blending the tactile and the visual. Her works exude a sense of lightness and delicacy, as if they were suspended between the realms of reality and imagination. With each piece, she invites us to explore the unseen aspects of fibers, shedding light on their versatile nature and the artistic expressions they can evoke.

Mary Giles
70mg Copper Divide, Mary Giles, waxed line, fine iron and copper wire and hammered copper wire, 2011-2013. Photo by Tom Grotta.

We then turned our attention to the remarkable talent of Mary Giles, a renowned artist celebrated for her mastery of the coiling technique. Within the world of fiber art, Giles stands out for her distinctive approach, which involves incorporating thin metal strips delicately shaped as human figures into her works. These metal elements are skillfully layered over a surface or core, adding a remarkable sense of depth and dimension to her creations.

Giles’s artistry transcends traditional boundaries, evoking both environmental features and human figures through her expert manipulation of materials. Her artworks serve as a captivating dialogue between art and nature, inviting us to explore the intricate relationship between humanity and the world around us.

Inspired by the sincerity and directness found in tribal art, Giles infuses her own artistic expression with a unique authenticity. Her works are a testament to her creative vision, one that honors traditional techniques while embracing innovation.

Ed Rossbach
213r Red Java, Ed Rossbach, mixed media, 8.75″ x 7.5″ x 7.5″, 1988. Photo by Tom Grotta

Ed Rossbach, a visionary artist whose contributions to the field of fiber art have left an enduring impact. Rossbach’s artistic journey spanned decades and was marked by fearless experimentation with unconventional materials and innovative weaving techniques.

Throughout his prolific career, Rossbach continued to evolve and diversify his artistic practice, showcasing his mastery of various mediums. From dimensional weaving in the 1960s to later explorations in cast paper techniques and mixed-media sculpture, Rossbach’s trajectory was one of continuous growth and innovation. His relentless pursuit of creative exploration and commitment to pushing the boundaries of fiber art make him a true pioneer in the field.

Rossbach’s artistic legacy remains a source of inspiration for contemporary fiber artists, as his ability to bridge the gap between traditional practices and cutting-edge techniques continues to resonate with artists and art enthusiasts alike. The trail he blazed in the world of fiber art will be forever cherished and celebrated.

Nancy Koenigsberg
1nak.1 5 Concentric Cubes, Nancy Koenigsberg, copper wire, 12” x 12” x 12”, 1995

Last, but certainly not least, we explored the world of Nancy Koenigsberg, a visionary artist hailing from the vibrant city of New York. Koenigsberg’s artistic prowess shines brilliantly in her captivating exploration of wire sculpture, where she fearlessly pushes the boundaries of artistic expression using copper, steel, and aluminum wire.

Through her meticulous craftsmanship, Koenigsberg creates wire grids that exude a mesmerizing visual and conceptual allure. The interplay of shiny and dull, fragile and industrial-strength materials adds a dynamic depth to her masterpieces, challenging our perceptions and inviting us to question the very essence of art.

Intrigued by her intuitive process, we find ourselves enchanted, as the artist expertly shapes and layers the wires into captivating forms. The resulting artworks evoke a sense of wonder, urging us to delve deeper into the enigmatic world she creates.

As we bring our exploration of the captivating worlds of Jane Sauer, Mia Olsson, Mary Giles, Ed Rossbach, and Nancy Koenigsberg to a close – we are filled with admiration for the ingenuity and artistry that each of these remarkable artists has brought to the world of fiber art. Join us again next month as we continue our journey through the captivating world of contemporary art, where we will introduce you to more visionary artists and their extraordinary creations!


Art Assembled – New This Week in June

Welcome to our June Art Assembled blog, where we are thrilled to highlight the incredible art featured in our New This Week series. As the summer season kicks off, we are excited to showcase the works of Anne Wilson, Ed Rossbach, Adela Akers, and Katherine Westphal – four visionary artists who have left an indelible mark on the world of contemporary art.

Throughout the month of June, we have been captivated by the diverse and thought-provoking creations of these artists. From Wilson’s boundary-pushing fiber art to Rossbach’s innovative weaving techniques and unconventional materials, each artwork invites us to explore new dimensions of artistic expression.

Join us as we delve into the artistic journeys of these remarkable individuals, uncovering the inspirations, techniques, and stories behind their extraordinary works!

Anne Wilson hair embroidery
1aw Areas of Disrepair F#27, Anne Wilson found cloth, hair and thread embroidery 15.5” x 12.625” x 2.5 1997

At the beginning of this month, we turned our spotlight to the extraordinary talent of Anne Wilson, a Chicago-based visual artist whose groundbreaking work pushes the boundaries of fiber art. Wilson’s artistic journey is a testament to her relentless pursuit of innovation and her ability to extend traditional processes into new media.

With her diverse range of mediums including sculpture, drawings, photography, performance, and stop-motion animations, Wilson seamlessly weaves together table linens, bed sheets, human hair, lace, glass, thread, and wire to create mesmerizing and thought-provoking compositions. Her art reflects a deep exploration of materiality, weaving together threads of emotion, history, and culture.

We think it’s safe to say that her meticulous craftsmanship and attention to detail are evident in every piece she creates. Through her art, Wilson explores themes of identity, memory, and the complex interplay between the personal and the universal.

Ed Rossbach foam rubber weaving
216r Gateway, Ed Rossbach, yellow and white plastic, foam rubber and plastic tape, 56″ x 46.5″ x 10″, 1970.

Next, we direct our attention to the remarkable artist Ed Rossbach. Rossbach was a visionary who made significant contributions to the world of fiber art. His artistic journey spanned decades, and his innovative techniques and unique approach to materials left an indelible mark on the field.

Rossbach’s exploration of weaving went beyond traditional boundaries, as he fearlessly incorporated unconventional materials such as plastics, foam rubber, and plastic tape into his works. His creations defied categorization, blurring the lines between sculpture, textiles, and mixed media. With an astute eye for detail and a penchant for experimentation, Rossbach crafted intricate and captivating pieces that challenged the notions of what fiber art could be.

Throughout his career, Rossbach’s work evolved and diversified, showcasing his mastery of various artistic mediums. From his groundbreaking dimensional weaving in the 1960s to his later explorations of cast paper techniques and mixed-media sculpture, his artistic trajectory was one of continuous growth and innovation. Through his artworks, Rossbach invites us to reimagine the possibilities of fiber as a medium and challenges us to see the world in new and exciting ways, and he will be forever cherished for it!

Adela Akers accordion weaving
14aa Window, Adela Akers, sisal, linen and wool 30” x 108” x 6”, 1998. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Later in the month, we shifted our focus to the remarkable artist Adela Akers, a Spanish-born textile and fiber artist with a rich and influential career spanning several decades. Since the 1950s, Akers has been at the forefront of the modern fiber art movement, making groundbreaking contributions to the field.

Through her innovative techniques and profound artistic expressions, Akers continues to inspire and captivate audiences with her thought-provoking creations. Her work serves as a bridge between traditional textile practices and contemporary art, pushing boundaries and expanding the possibilities of fiber as a medium. Adela Akers’ legacy as a trailblazing artist and her unwavering commitment to her craft make her an indispensable figure in the world of contemporary fiber art.

Along the way, Akers has received many prestigious awards, including grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation. In 2014, she was selected as an artist-in-residence at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, further solidifying her standing as an influential figure in the art community.

Katherine Westphal
46w Mir, Katherine Westphal, printed and drawn, dyed cotton patchwork 28” x 28” x 2.5”, 1997

Last, but certainly not least, we immerse ourselves in the captivating world of Katherine Westphal, a visionary artist known for her innovative approach to surface, pattern, and decoration in textiles, quilts, clothing, and baskets. Westphal’s artistic journey was marked by a distinct exploration of fractured and random images, which became a signature element of her work.

Her collages were a fusion of bold imagery and vibrant colors, reflecting her background and training as a painter. With a keen eye for composition and a willingness to experiment, she allowed the textile to evolve organically, embracing a process of building up and breaking down. Guided by her intuitive and visual senses, she incorporated techniques such as cutting, sewing, embroidery, quilting, tapestry, and fringing, until she felt the message was complete.

Westphal’s artistic legacy continues to inspire and influence contemporary fiber artists, as her boundary-pushing spirit and commitment to creative exploration remain as relevant today as ever.


As we conclude our journey through the remarkable artworks of Anne Wilson, Ed Rossbach, Adela Akers, and Katherine Westphal, we are left in awe of the depth and diversity of their artistic contributions. These artists have pushed boundaries, challenged conventions, and invited us to see the world through their unique perspectives. We hope that this month’s Art Assembled blog has inspired you, sparked your curiosity, and ignited a newfound appreciation for the power of art. Join us again next month as we continue to explore the captivating world of contemporary art and introduce you to more extraordinary artists. Thank you for joining us on this artistic adventure!