Category: Art Assembled

Art Assembled – New this Week in January

The first month of 2023 was busy and exciting at bga! Throughout the month we’ve introduced our followers to talented artists all over the globe that we’ve had the opportunity to work with over the years – including work from: Irina Kolesnikova, Sue Lawty, Naomi Kobayashi, Lia Cook, and Heidrun Schimmel. Read on to learn more about these accomplished artists!

23-25ik Limited Space 1-3, Irina Kolesnikova flax, silk, polyester, hand woven, 20″ x 16″ x 1.625″, each, 2022

To start off the month, we introduced you all to the work of skilled Russian artist, Irina Kolesnikova.  Kolesnikova has said that her works are often influenced by her daily life. She has said in her pieces you can often find aspects of her everyday life reflected in her work artwork. Kolesnikova state that these pieces often feature a glimpse into her alter ego, which she stated is “A slightly comic, clumsy human of an uncertain age (who is just a survivor struggling to keep his existence balanced.” 

However, when Kolesnikova emigrated from Russia to Germany in 2005, she says, “I got more air in my works. The combination of figurative elements with flying drawing lines or abstract spots of color has become more characteristic of my work. In the sketches I keep the principle of collage combined with freehand drawing.” We are fascinated by the evolution of her work!

 Sue Lawty
26-29sl Notes On Blue, Sue Lawty, block mounted woven linen and
hemp tapestry 6.3” x 4.75” (x4), 2022. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Next up, we have the work of brilliant UK artist, Sue Lawty. Lawty can is recognized internationally for her meticulous exploration of the mediums she works with. More in particular, her stone drawings and weavings of lead, and of linen, like the piece you see here.

She has previously charted the journey of her understated and abstract works – stating that they are strongly influenced by a comprehensive engagement with remote landscape, geology and the passage of time. Her work is rooted in the emotional, spiritual, and physical engagement with land through construction and repetitive structure, and she has been be featured in exhibitions all around the world because of it.

Naomi Kobayashi
65nk Works 115-116, Naomi Kobayashi, washi paper, koyori thread,
india ink, cotton, 26″ x 30″ x 3.5″. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Things got even more interesting in January with the introduction to Japanese textile and sculpture artist, Naomi Kobayashi. Kobayashi has been making strides in contemporary art for over 50 years. Along the way in her later years as a creator, she stated that she began to strive for pieces that have an airy feeling and incorporate air/wind within them. She said she strives for pieces that are so ephemeral, they feel as if they might disappear at any moment.

Her pieces are often carefully crafted from weavings of thread and strips of washi paper on which she has written calligraphy. Together, these pieces form to create installations that speak of cycles of life, regeneration and death.

Lia Cook
49lc Boophone, Lia Cook cotton, rayon woven, 21.75” x 16” x 2″, 2021

January included art by accomplished American fiber artist, Lia Cook. Cook is a California-based artist who has been recognized for her science-inspired art and her works created out of a fascination with nature. Cook has said that her garden is a continual source of renewal for her. In fact, Ferni Fronds Trip and Boophone Twin re-envision aspects of her early work with images of current plant fibers from her garden.

Cook’s practice explores the sensuality of the woven image and often, the emotional connections to memories of touch and cloth. Long recognized as an innovator, Cook’s work has been featured in dozens of group and solo exhibitions worldwide, and we’re honored that bgas’ are among them.

Heidrun Schimmel
Heidrun Schimmel‘s 30hsc Was du Weiß auf Schwarz Besitzt (text/textile/texture)
cotton and silk 47.5” x 49.5” each, 2009. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Last, but certainly not least, we featured the work of German artist, Heidrun Schimmel. Schimmel consistently impresses us with her detailed, hand-stitched artwork. Her ideas often stem from the soft, unstable and flexible qualities of the textile materials she works with.

When creating, Schimmel has stated that she aims to illustrate the connections between thread and time and thread and humanity, as they are interwoven into human existence.


Time and time again, we are amazed by the brilliant artists we have the opportunity to work with. We are excited for all that’s to come throughout the year of 2023. Keep following along to see what we have in store along the way!


Art Assembled – New this Week in December

We end 2022 with an exciting international grouping of works from artists located in Venezuela, Korea/Sweden, Japan and Spain, which were featured in New This Week this December.

Maria Dávila and Eduardo Portillo triple weave
21pd Cimbreante, Maria Dávila and Eduardo Portillo, silk , moriche, alpaca, metallic yarns, copper leaf, 54.5″ x 22″, 2018

First up, Cimebreante by the talented couple, Maria Dávila and Eduardo Portillo. The pair take an experimental approach to all aspects of their artwork — sourcing, technique and materials. They have spearheaded the techniques of rearing silk worms in Venezuela, weaving with locally sourced fibers and dyeing with natural dyes. They were inspired to include natural indigo in their innovative works by visits to Orinoco and the Amazon. They are recipients of Smithsonian Art Research Fellowship and Josef and Anni Albers Foundation Residencies.

Blue Jin-Sook So
65jss Blue/Gold Untitled 2021, Jin-Sook So steel mesh, painted, electroplated silver and gold leaf 31.5” x 31.5” x 4.5”, 2021

In the 80s, Jin-Sook So who has spent time in Korea, Sweden and Japan, began treating metals, such as stainless steel mesh, like textiles; bleaching, braiding, twisting, and oxidizing them, burnishing them with gold, silver and copper nitrate, using brushes, blow torches and wax. In her work for the Lausanne Biennial in 1989, she worked directly with flat steel mesh, developing volume by pleating it manually, repeating and twisting the form and then coloring it with a blow torch. Works like the effervescent Blue/Gold-Untitled 2021 have been shown extensively in Europe, Asia and the US to considerable acclaim.

Chiyoko Tanaka Grinden fabric weaving
72cht Permeated Black-Three Squares * Black and Black Gradation #912 • S, Chiyoko Tanaka, Handwoven ramie, 20″ x 45.125″ x 2.125″, 1990

Chiyoko Tanaka’s Permeated Black-Three Squares * Black and Black Gradation #912 is an example of her intensely rendered textiles. After creating exquisite fabrics on an obi loom, she abrades them with mud, rocks, clay, etc. Portions of the work are deliberately worn away as an actual and metaphorical representation of time. What results are works that have the graphic appeal of a contemporary painting and the tactile sensibility of an artifact.

Mercedes Vicente white sculpture
1mv Babela, Mercedes Vicente, canvas, 9.5″ x 11.5″ x 9.5″, 2022

Mecedes Vicente is based in Spain. Her sculptures are made of canvas strips using an intensely manual process. She loves the elastic, organic, flexible and translucent properties of the fabric with which she works.


We wish you all a full year of art and enjoyment!


Art Assembled: New This Week in November

The holiday season has commenced and we are feeling extra grateful to have the opportunity to work with so many talented artists! In November we highlighted some of our favorite works; which are currently on display in our Allies for Art exhibition online on Artsy. Read on to see what art we think you should check out!

Esmé Hofman
Esmé Hofman (NL) 3eh Double Basket No 5 black willow, fine-skein, elmwood 11” x 10” x 19.75”, 2019

To kick off our New This Week series in November, we introduced the work of Esmé Hofman. Hofman is an artist that grew up and resides in the Netherlands. She is is known for taking a modern approach to her work. When asked about her process, she has said when creating she is often prepared to look beyond the borders of traditional handcraft – which gives her the freedom to explore creative possibilities.

 “As a traditional maker there are three pillars in my work, which are equally important,” said Esmé Hofman. “These are function, materials and technique. By letting the function go, I get more freedom to place an emphasis on form. This gives me freedom to explore new ways of making.”

Åse Ljones
16al Dobbel Domino, Åse Ljones, hand embroidery on linen, stretched on frame, 56.675″ x 57″ x 2.5″, 2015

The second piece we have for our readers is Dobbel Domino, which was created by Åse Ljones. Ljones is a renowned Norwegian artist who is widely known in the art world for her complex hand embroidered pieces, which incorporate stitch drawings that Ljones meticulously details. When asked about her art and process Ljones said:

“To embroider by hand takes time. It is a slow process that gives room for silence. I seek silence. In silence, I retrieve memories and find new paths forward. In all my work as an artist I have eliminated the extraneous. I’ve cultivated simplicity to approach the core of myself, in myself, with fewer measures.” 

Stéphanie Jacques
16sj Ce qu’il en reste IV, Stéphanie Jacques, osier, enduit, fil, 40.5″ x 16″ x 11″, 2015

Things got even more impressive throughout the month with art from Belgium-based artist, Stéphanie Jacques. She is known for being a relentless reinventer when it comes to her art. Figures created by Jacques are clearly humanoid, but less literal.

For a long time I have been trying to create a figure that stands upright,” said Stéphanie Jacques. “All of this is related to the questions I ask myself about femininity and sexual identity. My driving forces are the emotions, the wants and the impossibilities that are particular to me. Once all this comes out, I seek to make it resonate in others. My work is not a lament, but a place where I can transform things to go on.”

Wlodzimierz Cygan
16wc Proverbs V, Wlodzimierz Cygan, wool, sisal, 73″ x 49.25″, 2005. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Last, but not least, we bring you the work of Polish artist, Wlodzimierz Cygan. Cygan has been creating (and teaching) groundbreaking textile creations for years and has been exhibited all around the world. Growing up, Cygan lived in a city in Poland called Łódź, which has very strong textile traditions that inspired him to create the works of art you see today.

“When trying to determine why the means of artistic expression in tapestry was becoming archaic,” said Wlodzimierz Cygan. “I realized that one of the reasons might have to do with the custom of treating the threads of the weft as the chief medium of the visual message. . . These observations led me to wonder how the artistic language of textiles might benefit from a warp whose strands would not be parallel and flat but convergent, curved or three dimensional ….”

As always, we hope you enjoyed the art we’ve highlighted throughout November. If you’re keen on any of the pieces that we’ve highlighted, works from Allies for Art: Work from NATO-related countries are viewable and available for purchase on Artsy. The exhibition has been documented in a catalog produced by browngrotta arts. To get a print copy for yourself, click here.


Art Assembled: New This Week in October

October was a month full of fun and creativity at browngrotta arts. Our Fall Art in the Barn exhibition, Allies for Art, went off without a hitch! We always enjoy getting the opportunity to meet our fellow art lovers.

Throughout the month we also introduced you to even more new art each week with our New This Week category! Now, we are recapping what the month brought forth.

Lizzie Farey
19-21lf Sauchen Curach I-III willow by Lizzie Farey, paper clay 37” x 3.125” x 2” 36.25” x 2.75” x 3” 38” x 3” x 3.25”, 2020. Photo by Tom Grotta.

First up on our list we have Sauchen Curach I-III by Lizzie Farey. Farey has stated that her work is often inspired and driven from her fascination with living things and natural form. Viewers can recognized these themes from the intricate details present in her work.

“For me, willow has become a medium for an interaction with nature that is deeply personal,” said Lizzie Farey. “Using willow, birch, heather, bog myrtle and many other locally grown woods, my work ranges form traditional to organic sculptural forms.”

Gertrud Hals
9-11gh Ultima Copper, Green, Orange, Gjertrud Hals, cotton, linen, pigment, 25″ x 24″ x 24″, each, 2021. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Up next we have the contemporary work of Norwegian textile artist, Gjertrud Hals. Hals’ has said that her work is largely influenced by the time she has spent in countries across the world, including: India, Jordan, Norway and Japan.

When asked about her work, Hals said:

“I was born and raised on a small island on the northwestern coast of Norway, and this has to a large extent influenced my artwork,” said Gjertrud Hals. “As a seasoned traveler I have observed many different cultures. Much of my artistic work is an attempt at expressing the connection between the island’s micro-history and the world’s macro-history.”

Baiba Osite
2-4bo Blue, Gray and Red Square, Baiba Osite, driftwood, canvas 27.5” x 27.5” x 2” each, 2022. Photos by Tom Grotta.

Introducing you all to the work of Latvian textile artist Baiba Osite. We had the honor of featuring Osite’s work in our fall exhibition for the first time ever! Across the globe, Osite is known for her work with different fiber materials including driftwood, glass beads, wire, metal spirals, wool and linen. Her work is also inspired by traditional ethnographic patterns and influenced by different cultures

The works that you see featured here were made from driftwood segments that Osite collects on the shore of the Baltic Sea.

Jan Hladik
4jh Der Rote Gobelin, Jan Hladik hand dyed wool 79” x 60”, 1966. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Although we know this artist needs no introduction – we introduce you all the the work of the late Jan Hladik. Haldik was a Czech Post War & Contemporary artist, and is still known globally for his groundbreaking textile artwork.

Haldik was another artist that we proudly featured in Allies for Art, so we are excited to announce that you can still get your hands on his work today!

 Ritzi and Peter Jacobi
10rj Exotica Series, Ritzi and Peter Jacobi, cotton, goat hair and sisal, 114″ x 60″ x 6″, 1975

Last, but not least, we invite you to take a look at the Exotica Series by one of the most innovative duos in the industry, Ritzi and Peter Jacobi. Ritzi and Peter Jacobi collaborated on textile works for 15 years, from 1967 to 1984 to be exact.

The tapestry that you see today is a collection of the works that they began to create together in the 70s after observing the medieval religious embroidery tradition of their native country, Romania. Within this decade, the duo explored abstraction as their dominant mode of expression.

As always, we hope you enjoy viewing and learning about the extraordinary artists we have the opportunity to work with. If you like what we highlighted throughout the month, we encourage you to view Allies for Art: Work from NATO-related countries, which is now live on Artsy until January 9, 2023. To get a print copy for yourself, click here.


Art Assembled: New This Week in September

As we settle into fall, things have not stopped heating up in our neck of the woods! This past month, we’ve been busy prepping for our Fall Art in the Barn exhibition and introducing you all to new artwork from artists all across the globe. Today, we’re recapping what we’ve brought into the mix throughout September.

Aleksandra Stoyanov
11-14as Waiting 1-4, Aleksandra Stoyanov, weaving and pencil drawing on cotton fabric, sisal, cotton fabric, 92.0” x 33” each, 2012. Photo by Tom Grotta.

To start off our series, we bring you Waiting 1-4, which was crated by Ukrainian artist, Aleksandra Stoyanov. This specific collection was the result of some of the unimaginable circumstances that this Stoyanov has experienced throughout her life.

This artwork’s inspiration dates back to the 1990s, after Stoyanov immigrated to Israel amid the worsening anti-semitism in Ukraine where she was born. Each panel in this collection stands nearly eight-feet tall and incorporates the image of a Ukrainian person drawn in pencil and woven in cloth.

This work was woven from Stoyanov’s own handmade threads of raw wool and portrays a deeply emotional quality.

Jiro Yonezawa
111jy Red Fissure 22/3, Jiro Yonezawa, bamboo, cane urushi lacquer, 17″ x 20″ x 17″, 2022. Photo by Tom Grotta.

This next piece was created by internationally acclaimed artist, Jiro Yonezawa. Yonezawa has been paving the way with his innovative bamboo craftsmanship for nearly 40 years.

His artwork can often be recognized for the contrast of disciplined formality in technique and natural freedom in form, which Yonezawa creates through exploration of traditional techniques.

When asked about his work, Yonezawa said:

“Bamboo basketry for me is an expression of detailed precision. In each basket there is the contrast of disciplined formality in technique and natural freedom in form. There is an element of intrigue and an element of complexity for what lies beyond form. These baskets represent a search for the beauty and precision in nature and a way to balance the chaos evident in these times.”

Anda Klancic
19ak B’ Still life, Anda Klancic, hand-controlled machine-embroidered lace, cotton, synthetic, metal threads, 54” x 37,” 1996/2020. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Our next piece was created by Slovenian artist Anda Klancic. Klancic has been recognized internationally for her use a combination of innovative embroidery techniques, many of which are patented under her name, allowing her to meticulously blend metal with cloth cotton or tree bark to fashion abstract pieces that crystallize the aesthesis of nature.

Klancic’s work can often be identified from her innovative and creative use of the machine-embroidered lace technique, which she skillfully combines with experience from other disciplines like photography. Often, her work attempts to express the relationship between humanity and nature.

Micheline Beauchemin
7mb-Petites ailes de glacé blanc, Micheline Beauchemin, nylon, silk and silver aluminum wire, lead wire, 30″ x 32.25″ x 7″, 1980’s. Photos by Tom Grotta.

Last, but not least, we brought you artwork from the late Micheline Beauchemin of Canada. Beauchemin was and still remains a major figure in visual arts – best known for monumental tapestries and theater curtains, as well as works of embroidery and stained glass, costumes and paintings.

As a weaver, Beauchemin’s repertoire of materials included unique combinations of handspun wool, silk and other natural fibers, as well as nylon, aluminum, and gold and silver threads.

As always, we hope you enjoy viewing and learning about these talented contemporary artisst. If you like what we highlighted throughout September; we keep them coming every week, so stay tuned!

As we approach October, make sure you mark your calendar for our upcoming Art in the Barn event, Allies for Art: Work from NATO-related countries (October 8-16, 2022), it’s an event you won’t want to miss! Click here for more information and to reserve your spot.


Art Assembled: New This Week in August

There are few things we enjoy more than introducing you all to the brilliant art of the artists we have the honor to work with. This month, we showcased the work of artists: Heidrun Schimmel, Caroline Bartlett, Sue Lawty, Zofia Butrymowicz, and Włodzimierz Cygan. Read on to see what these artists have been busy creating!

Heidrun Schimmel
1hsc Behind the Lines of Thread, Heidrun Schimmel, cotton, steel, paper, 55″ x 74″ x 3.5″, 2004. Photo by Tom Grotta.

This German artist, Heidrun Schimmel, consistently impresses us with her detailed, handstitched artwork. Her ideas often stem from the soft, unstable and flexible qualities of the textile materials she works with. For the realization of her ideas, she stitches white cotton thread by hand onto transparent silk; which she has noted to be the simplest material and simplest technique: the stitch.

When asked about her process, Schimmel stated:

“Stitching by hand exclusively, I take my ideas from specific qualities of the thread and the stitching process. Behind the Lines of Thread shows the so-called “left side” of the thread lines. The tensions between these thread lines protect the “right side,” which the viewer cannot see. Each piece has its own individual shape and at the same time it enters into a relationship with all the other parts. “

Caroline Bartlett
21cb Every Ending has a New Beginning, Caroline Bartlett, hand-painted and mono-printed, stitched and manipulated linen, cotton threads 30” x 96”, 2021. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Up next, we have the innovative work of UK textile artist, Caroline Bartlett. With textiles at the core of her practice, Bartlett’s artwork is often created in reference to historical, social and cultural associations. Bartlett’s practice is driven by questions – for example around the tensions between personal recollection and the public ways of remembrance and the potential of materials and objects to trigger recollection and association.

“As age and experience expand, I find myself more aware of how I work,” said Caroline Bartlett. “I continue to actively need fresh challenges while knowing and recognizing limitations of self and the art world in general. Again the push/pull. No room for complacency.”

What a profound lens into her creative practice!

Sue Lawty
Sue Lawty 30sl Tacitum II hemp and linen on cotton warp 11.75” x 8.5” x 1″, 2022. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Tacitum II was created by acclaimed artist, Sue Lawty. Lawty is an England-based artist who is widely known for her meticulous exploration of the mediums she works with.

She has charted the journey of her understated and abstract works – stating that they are strongly influenced by a comprehensive engagement with remote landscape, geology and the passage of time.

Lawty’s work is rooted in the emotional, spiritual, and physical engagement with land through construction and repetitive structure, and the inspired creation behind her pieces shows!

Zofia Butrymowicz
7zb Marco, Zofia Butrymowicz, wool, 37″ x 34″, 1966. Photo by Tom Grotta.

This next piece holds a special place in our hearts as it comes from the late Zofia Butrymowicz. Butrymowicz has been recognized globally for her innovative works in the ‘60s and ‘70s – often using thread she spun herself in Poland during the post-war period when supplies were in a great shortage.

This work is made from wool sourced from Canadian artist, Mariette Rousseau-Vermette. Back in 1969, Butrymowicz visited Canadian weaver, Mariette Rousseau-Vermette and her husband, painter and ceramicist, Claude Vermette, outside Montreal where the couple lived and worked. Zofia stayed with the Vermettes for several months, using Mariette’s looms to create tapestries that were displayed with Claude’s ceramics at a local gallery.

To create this piece, Zofia “painted” the weavings made from Canadian wool with colors and shadings of yarns, including only a shimmering suggestion of a shape, often a circle, as she had done in other tapestries, but the glisten and sumptuousness of the yarn from Rousseau-Vermette used in this particular piece sets it apart from her other works.

19wc NOW, Włodzimierz Cygan, wool, sisal, 124″ x 62″, 2000. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Last, but not least, we highlighte the work of Włodzimierz Cygan. Cygan is known globally for his textile innovations. Growing up, Cygan lived in a city in Poland called Łódź, which has very strong textile traditions that inspired him to create the works of art you see today.

“When trying to determine why the means of artistic expression in tapestry was becoming archaic,” said Cygan, “I realized that one of the reasons might have to do with the custom of treating the threads of the weft as the chief medium of the visual message. . . . These observations led me to wonder how the artistic language of textiles might benefit from a warp whose strands would not be parallel and flat but convergent, curved or three dimensional ….”

As a result of these explorations, in some of Cygan’s works, the warp changes direction, enabling the weaving of circles or arcs.

We hope you enjoyed learning about these prominent contemporary artist.s If you like what we have highlighted this month, keep your eye out for more – we keep them coming every week.

In the meantime, mark your calendar for our upcoming Art in the Barn event, Allies for Art: Work from NATO-related countries (October 8-16, 2022), it’s an event you won’t want to miss! Click here for more information and to reserve your spot.


Art Assembled: New This Week in July

Things certainly don’t slow down in the summer over here at browngrotta arts, and July was a testament to that. This month, we’ve introduced you all to works by Lewis Knauss, Shoko Fukuda and Laura Foster Nicholson in our New This Week series. Read on to see what impressive work these artists have been busy creating.

Lewis Knauss
35lk Fire Fright, Lewis Knauss, hemp, linen, acrylic paint, 14.5″ x 14″ x 1.5″, 2021. Photo by Tom Grotta.

This colorful piece was created by American artist Lewis Knauss. This particular work was inspired by the environment; more specifically, fires and climate change that has occurred as an impact of over consumption of fossil fuels.

Knauss uses his work as a tool to explore his memories of place and his surroundings in a meaningful way.

Shoko Fukuda
2sf Bound Corners, Shoko Fukuda, ramie, monofilament, plastic, silicone, 5.5″ x 4.75″ x 5.5″, 2021

This complex and ethereal artwork comes from Shoko Fukuda. Fukuda is a basketmaker and Japanese artist that’s been making monumental strides in the art world for over a decade. Often, her work features materials like sisal, ramie and raffia.

She has said she’s interested in “distortion” as a characteristic of basket weaving:
“As I coil the thread around the core and shape it while holding the layers together, I look for the cause of distortion in the nature of the material, the direction of work and the angle of layers to effectively incorporate these elements into my work,” said Fukuda. “The elasticity and shape of the core significantly affect the weaving process, as the thread constantly holds back the force of the core trying to bounce back outward.”

Laura Foster Nicholson
Laura Foster Nicholson, 22lf CMA CGM, wool, mylar, cotton, 27.5” x 68”, 2021. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Last, but not least, we introduce you to the unique textile artwork of Laura Foster Nicholson. This American artist is known for her powerful hand woven tapestries that feature whimsical, engaging imagery. Much like the work of Lewis Knauss, Nicholson’s work is often created with the state of the world in mind – including theme’s of how climate change and over consumption is impacting our world today.

With fall quickly approaching, we want to give you all plenty of warning that we have some very exciting exhibitions in the works for you all. Keep your eyes pealed and follow along to see what impressive artwork we bring into our fold in the months to come!


Art Assembled: New This Week in June

We kicked off the beginning of summer in true browngrotta arts style – with lots of creativity and outstanding art. Throughout the month we introduced our followers to a wide variety of new art from impressive artists, including: Jeannet Leendertse, Toshio Sekiji, Judy Mulford, and Rachel Max. Curious what these artists are bringing to the table this summer? Read on for the full scoop.

Jeannet Leendertse
3jl Vase-shaped seaweed vessel, Jeannet Leendertse, coiled and stitched basket, Rockweed [ascophyllum nodosum], waxed linen, beeswax, tree resin, 15″ x 11″ x 11″, 2022 Photo by Tom Grotta.

This complex and detailed art comes from talented Dutch fiber artist, Jeannet Leendertse. Having grown up on the Dutch shore and migrating to the rugged coast of Maine in the states – her fiber work often finds sculptural form in landscapes she’s familiar with.

She often explores the concept of belonging in her work by incorporating work that feels like home within the marine environment that surrounds her.

Toshio Sekiji
28ts Subcontinent, Toshio Sekiji, Red, green, yellow, black, and natural lacquer; Hindi (Delhi) and Malayalam (Kerala State) newspapers, 61″ x 61″, 2001. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Up next we have art from internationally acclaimed Japanese artist, Toshio Sekiji. When creating pieces like Subcontinent, Sekiji often explores and merges cultures in his art, telling new stories atop of the old. His technique makes for pieces that are both contemporary and nostalgic.

Sekiji’s works are often made of lacquered newspapers from Japan, India, Korea and the US and are exemplary of the traditional Japanese aesthetic wabi-sabi, a world view centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection.

Judy Mulford
30jm A Day at the Beach, Judy Mulford, mixed media, 6″ x 9.5″ x 9.5″, 1997. Photo by Tom Grotta.

A Day at the Beach comes from Californian artist, Judy Mulford. Mulford created groundbreaking art for over 50 years. She is known in the art world for complex creations that celebrate women and the family. When asked about her art and inspirations, Mulford said:

 “My art honors and celebrates the family,” said Judy Mulford. “It is autobiographical, personal, narrative, and a scrapbook of my life. Each piece I create becomes a container of conscious and unconscious thoughts and feelings: a nest, a womb, a secret, a surprise, or a giggle.”

Rachel Max
12rm Balance, Rachel Max, plaited and twined cane, 12″ x 16″ x 9″, 2022. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Last, but not least, we have art from esteemed artist and sculptural basketmaker, Rachel Max. Max created Balance during the height of the pandemic for our Crowdsourcing exhibition. When creating this piece, Max discussed how she aimed to have her artwork reflect on the new found spatial awareness and of “sense touch” throughout society as the air between us and the surfaces we touch became dangerous.

“My aim was to distort the form, but still create something that is both finite and infinite,” said Rachel Max. “It’s rare that the title of a piece comes to me during the making process but as I was weaving this I became aware of its changing weight and stability, forcing me to rethink how I originally intended it to be seen. It became a subconscious reflection on the world we are in now: everything seems to be in the balance.”

If you enjoyed this series – there will be no shortage of new art that we’re bringing into our fold this summer. Be sure to follow along to see what other artwork and projects we will be launching!


Art Assembled: New This Week in May

May was a busy month for the browngrotta arts family. Throughout May, we launched our spring exhibition, Crowdsourcing the Collective: a survey of textiles and mixed media art, and it was quite the success! Throughout the month, we introduced some exceptional art to you all. Just in case you missed it, we’re recapping it all here.

Blair Tate
16bt RePair, Blair Tate, linen, cotton rope and aluminum 83” x 58”, 2022. Photo by Tom Grotta.

this piece, RePair, was created by American artist Blair Tate. Tate has been exploring flat woven grids in her work since the 70s. When interviewed about her art, more specifically weaving, Tate said:

“In weaving there is a direct analogy between textile and text – the construction of fabric and the process of writing. Both have methodical underpinnings that provide the framework for development. Both woven strips and written sentences can be rearranged to re-contextualize, to forge relationships, to develop meaning.”  

James Bassler
14jb On Inca Time, James Bassler, four selvedge weaving (scaffold weave) handspun and commercial wool, silk, linen, ramie, sisal, cotton, natural and synthetic dyes, 43″ x 36.75″, 2019. Photo by Tom Grotta.

American textile artist James Bassler did not disappoint when it comes to On Inca Time. This piece was created with inspiration from Pre-Columbian Andean Cultures, which you can see displayed through the checkerboard pattern throughout the four-selvedge weave. For decades Bassler has applied ancient techniques and materials to create works with contemporary themes, and we remain in awe of the outcome!

Eduardo Portillo & Mariá Eugenia Dávila
22pd Océano Cósmico, Eduardo Portillo & Mariá Eugenia Dávila, silk, cotton,
alpaca, indigo and copper leaf, 59” x 31”, 2022. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Océano Cósmico was created by Venezuelan artists Eduardo Portillo & Mariá Eugenia Dávila

These artists’ work is often driven by their relationship with their surroundings and how their ideas can be communicated within a contemporary textile language. Océano Cósmico reflects their conception of an imagined Cosmos, “a parallel world that we still see in the midst of changing times.” They also aim to promote an understanding and appreciation of natural dyes as an element in textiles, their importance as a means to preserve and disseminate cultural values and as a medium of contemporary expression. 

Norma Minkowitz
95nm Mother Mine, Norma Minkowitz, Mixed media
(My Mother’s Gloves) and fiber, 6.5″ x 11.75″ x 8″, 1984. Photo by Tom Grotta.

This profound artwork comes from one of our favorite artists, Norma Minkowitz. This particular piece of work incorporates a pair of gloves her mother owned as a tribute. 

Pat Campbell
36pc Mandela IV, Pat Campbell, rice paper, reed and wood, 19.75″ x 14.5″ x 9.875″, 2012

This exceptional piece of art comes from American artist, Pat Campbell. Often, Campbell’s intricate, airy pieces are influenced by Japanese shoji screen, which is traditionally made of rice paper. When asked about the why behind the her medium of choice, Campbell said: 

“Paper is exciting to work with. It is a fragile material that can be easily ripped or torn,” said Pat Campbell.” It is a natural choice of material for my work. It provides the translucency I am seeking in constructions.”

We drop new art every week, so follow us on social media to keep up with the art we bring into the fold! To get your hands on some art of your own, checkout our exhibition: Crowdsourcing the Collective: a survey of textiles and mixed media art, which is available online until June 13.


Art Assembled: New This Week in April

Although launching our spring exhibition, Crowdsourcing the Collective: a survey of textiles and mixed media art, has kept us busy, we still had no shortage of new art to introduce you to in April. We presented art from many talented artists, including work from: Masako Yoshida, Ethel Stein, Polly Barton, and John McQueen. Just in case you missed out, we’re covering all the details about these artists and their art! Read on for more.

Masako Yoshida
14my Air Hole #838, Masako Yoshida, walnut and flax, 8″ x 8″ x 7″, 2017

This artwork comes from Japanese basketmaker, Masako Yoshida. Yoshida created this piece by interlacing sheets of walnut bark with string made of nettle. When asked about her work, Yoshida said:

“My work provides a means of release, allowing the truth to emerge and open the mind. In the process, I ask myself, ‘what is my connection to society?'”

Ethel Stein
56es Touch of Green, Ethel Stein, mercerized cotton, 31.5” x 36” x 1/4”, 2008. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Touch of Green comes from the late Ethel Stein, who was an exceptional American textile artist. Within her career, Stein created countless intricate textile pieces, and browngrotta arts has had the honor of representing her work for nearly 15 years.

Within Stein’s work, she has been known for using reproposed items that have been discarded as a medium and creating something miraculous with them. Often, her artwork is distinguished by its rhythmic simplicity, although it’s created with extraordinary technical complexity.

Polly Barton
8pb Thistledown, Polly Barton, handwoven double ikat with Japanese silk warp and Japanese silk wrapped around a metal core, 41” x 31” x 1.125”, 2016. Photo by Tom Grotta.

Thistledown was created by nationally recognized American fiber artist, Polly Barton. Trained in Japan, Barton is known for working with traditional methods of binding and dyeing bundles of fiber to weave contemporary imagery. More specifically, Barton is known for her talent in adapting the ancient weaving technique of ikat into contemporary woven imagery.

Barton has been charting the way for fiber art over the past 40 years. In fact, early in here career in 1981, Barton moved to Kameoka, Japan to study with master weaver, Tomohiko Inoue.

John McQueen
John McQueen, 32jm Out From Under, wood, willow, bark, and held together with tiny spikes of bamboo 20.75” x 25.25” x 16”, 2021. Photo by Tom Grotta.

This artwork was created by American artist, John McQueen. Within his work, viewers can often find themes of prominent world associations. Often, his three-dimensional works are created with natural materials like twigs, bark, cardboard – he prides himself on being able to create with found objects.

McQueen has discussed how plastic and metal are ubiquitous in landfills and our own trash and he hopes to draw attention to this waste problem with his art, as we are burying ourselves in waste without seeing it.

If you like the art you see – keep your eye out for even more in May! You’ll even have the opportunity to see art in person at our spring exhibition launching this weekend. Visit: https://bit.ly/38QiXCe to join us.